Adventure Sports Journal 12/20 work day recap; Tread Bikes 1/10 work day announced

Squeaky clean, but not for long! Volunteers prepare for a day of trail work in the forest. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Squeaky clean, but not for long! Volunteers prepare for a day of trail work in the forest. Photo: Michele Lamelin

SDSF Volunteer Trail Work Day #2 Recap, sponsored by Adventure Sports Journal

25 volunteers pitched in for trails this past Saturday December 22 at Soquel Demonstration State Forest (SDSF). Crews worked on drainage and other maintenance issues on Ridge Trail and the existing flow trail segments.

Hospitality provided by California-based Adventure Sports Journal included a delicious lunch, post-workday snacks, and an array of raffle goodies. Whole Foods fueled volunteers with morning coffee and breakfast treats, and Ninkasi provided post-workday beverages. Summit Store contributed as usual by offering a deep discount on lunch. We appreciate Saturday’s hardworking crew and generous sponsors!

Volunteer involvement is crucial to completing the flow trail. Work days are scheduled twice a month (see Volunteer Trail Work Day Schedule), and include breakfast, lunch, and post-work day refreshments and volunteer raffle. All are welcome—no trail work experience required! Our supportive, experienced crew leaders and trail builders will teach you techniques and make a confident trail builder out of you in no time flat. Keep in mind that trail work days may be cancelled or rescheduled due to inclement weather and/or hazardous conditions.

The next SDSF Volunteer Trail Work Day is scheduled for Saturday, January 10 and is sponsored by Tread Bikes in Campbell. Mark your calendar and stay tuned for details!

The crew gets briefed on safety guidelines and other important information. Photo: Michele Lamelin

The crew gets briefed on safety guidelines and other important information. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Staff and crew leaders work up the plan for the day. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Staff and crew leaders work up the plan for the day. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Fueling up on coffee and breakfast treats courtesy Whole Foods. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Fueling up on coffee and breakfast treats courtesy Whole Foods. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Big thanks to Adventure Sports Journal for sponsoring the work day, taking great care of our volunteers. Photo: Matt De Young

Big thanks to Adventure Sports Journal for sponsoring the work day, taking great care of our volunteers. Photo: Matt De Young

The completed segments of the flow trail are holding up well requiring little maintenance, although a few sections needed some additional shaping. Photo: Mark Davidson

The completed segments of the flow trail are holding up well requiring little maintenance, although a few sections needed some additional shaping. Photo: Mark Davidson 

A crew works to resolve a drainage situation on Ridge. Photos: Meredith Jacobson

A crew works to resolve a drainage situation on Ridge. Photos: Meredith Jacobson

Watch out for the California newt (Taricha torosa) when riding SDSF — rainy season = breeding season, so they're out and about looking for love. Also, keep in mind they are toxic, so no touchy! Did you know a California newt can live more than 20 years? Learn more about this boss critter. Photo: Mark Davidson.

Watch out for the California newt (Taricha torosa) when riding SDSF — rainy season = breeding season, so they’re out and about looking for love. Also, keep in mind they are toxic, so no touchy! Did you know a California newt can live more than 20 years? Photo: Mark Davidson.

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Enchanted forest. Photo: Mark Davidson

Tired but productive volunteers return to the parking area for snacks and a raffle courtesy Adventure Sports Journal, and cold beverages provided by Ninkasi. Photo: Michele Lamelin

Tired but productive volunteers return to the parking area for snacks and a raffle courtesy Adventure Sports Journal, and cold beverages provided by Ninkasi. Photo: Michele Lamelin

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Hikers stop by to chat about their adventures in the forest. Photo: Michele Lamelin

You, too, can be this happy — come dig in the dirt with us next Volunteer Trail Work Day! Photo: Michele Lamelin

You, too, can be this happy — come dig in the dirt with us next Volunteer Trail Work Day! Photo: Michele Lamelin

The SDSF flow trail was featured as the Adventure Sports Journal cover story in their April/May 2014 issue. The article was written by SDSF flow trail builder Matt De Young with photography by MBoSC volunteer Bogdan Marian.

The SDSF flow trail was featured as the Adventure Sports Journal cover story in their April/May 2014 issue. The article was written by SDSF flow trail builder Matt De Young with photography by MBoSC volunteer Bogdan Marian.


Other ways you can help with the flow trail project:

  • JOIN OUR WEEKDAY DIG CREW: We will also hold informal work days during the week Tuesday through Friday, weather permitting. Contact us for further details if you can join us. 
  • ASSIST WITH OTHER TASKS: If you want to help out, but aren’t keen on digging, there are still lots of ways you can help out without breaking a sweat; check out our Help Wanted page for ways you can get involved.
  • SPONSOR A VOLUNTEER TRAIL WORK DAY: Promote your business while supporting a community driven project by pitching in to help MBoSC put on an A+ Volunteer Trail Work Day. Your sponsorship donation will provide hospitality for volunteers as well as cover MBoSC’s costs to plan and organize the event. Learn more here.
  • DONATE EQUIPMENT/RAFFLE ITEMS/CASH:. We need to raise another $140,000 in order to complete the flow trail. We also could use raffle items to reward our volunteers with, and certain equipment useful for trail building. Details here.
  • TAKE OUR SURVEY: Have you ridden the flow  yet? We want to know what you think. Your feedback will help us evaluate our work so far and plan the remaining segments. Chime in here.

 

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